Talent acquisition

If They Do Not Fit, They’ll Likely Quit: Decoding The DNA Fit For Your Company

By Jeff Boucher on Jul 1, 2015

Do you remember where you were when you first heard of DNA? For me, it was watching the highly televised OJ Simpson trial. What am amazing scientific breakthrough, the ability to unequivocally determine a match based on the very essence of who you are.

Your company has DNA too. Sometimes referred to as “personality” or “culture”, company DNA is the life blood of your organization. It is more than “Wacky Tie Friday” or a ping-pong table in the break room. A candidate’s potential cultural match is inborn, it cannot be a learned trait – they either have it or they don’t: it’s in their DNA.

But why is finding a match important? You’ve taken the time to sit down and meticulously define your core values along with the vision and mission of your company. Now as you grow, you need to make sure you’re hiring people who share those beliefs. Candidates who are technical fits CAN do the job but candidates who are cultural fits as well will enjoy the job they do – and that means they’ll stick around because they believe in what they’re doing.

But how do you screen for a DNA fit?

Read the full blog HERE

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Three Ways to Ensure You Don’t Lose the Perfect Candidate

Often, the hunt for the perfect candidate can be long and arduous. So when the right candidate walks in, you know – and you want to snag them quickly.

Chances are, if the candidate is talented and personable, with all the right skills for your industry, they’re very much in demand. How can you ensure you’re the one they choose?

Securing the Perfect Candidate

  1. Move quickly: In today’s job market, there’s a wealth of qualified candidates eagerly applying for open positions. This is great because it means the likelihood of finding a top candidate is higher, but it also can make it harder for recruiters to narrow down field – resulting in multiple interviews. The problem with a multi-step interview process (some companies are moving to three, four, even five rounds of interviews before hiring) is that top candidates may find another position in the meantime. When you move to the interview stage, be prepared to move quickly. Ensure decision makers can meet with your candidate before setting up interview times, and give a realistic and accurate time frame.
  2. Arm yourself with information: Top candidates may be entertaining offers from a variety of companies, and will likely have questions about benefits, salary, opportunities to move up, and other information for you. Make sure you already have those answers from the supervisors or hiring managers so you can answer them quickly. If you have to dig for information, you might make the candidate feel uncertain or lose interest.
  3. Be prepared to negotiate: If you know unequivocally that this is the candidate you want for the job, be ready to fight for the. If they’re holding out for more vacation time or other perks, know what you can offer them within company policy – have this prepared and approved ahead of time so you can move quickly, as mentioned in the first tip.

You may have noticed a unifying theme here: speed. It’s of the essence when trying to land a top candidate. Though the overall job market is crowded, the top candidates stand out – and they won’t be available for long.

By  in Talent Acquisition