elwood staffing

Elwood Staffing Grows Again!

ELWOOD STAFFING ACQUIRES ENCORE STAFFING, EXPANDS GEOGRAPHICAL REACH

(Columbus, Ind.) July 24, 2014–Elwood Staffing announced today that it has purchased the assets of Encore Staffing Services, the commercial staffing division of Spencer Reed Group, LLC.

The acquisition includes 12 Encore branch offices, which serve clients in metropolitan locations across the Midwest, West Coast, and Northeast. This transaction expands Elwood’s service footprint into Missouri and Kansas and further broadens its presence in California, Colorado, Texas, Arizona, and Pennsylvania.

This marks the second acquisition for Elwood in the past 18 months. In February of 2013, Elwood acquired national staffing provider SOS Employment Group, a transaction that doubled its staff count and service footprint.

“Encore’s light industrial specialization is Elwood’s bread and butter, so this is a natural fit that strengthens our presence in new and existing markets. We’ve got our eyes set on growth, and this move increases our ability to meet client demands in a fast-growing, competitive industry,” says Elwood’s CEO, Mark S. Elwood.

Elwood plans to rebrand all Encore offices under the Elwood Staffing name, with completion expected in the next 90 days.

With the addition of Encore to Elwood’s portfolio, it continues to lead the industry with over 250 service locations throughout 31 states and Canada, boasts annual revenues of approximately $900 million and employs approximately 1,000 internal employees.

Elwood is maintaining a strong track record of growth and is committed to continuing this trend. According to Elwood, “The company has aggressive growth goals over the next year and a half and will continue to look for growth opportunities that make good business sense and fit with our core strengths.”

Financial details of the transaction were not announced. CHILDS Advisory Partners served as Encore’s exclusive financial advisor. Information on Elwood Staffing and its services can be found at http://www.elwoodstaffing.com.

Jenny Penrod
Marketing and Communications, EDT
Ph.: 812-372-6200 x1249
E-mail: jenny.penrod@elwoodstaffing.com

Joni Heidt
Marketing and Communications, PST
Ph.: 801-924-8246elwood w-tag 2597
E-mail: joni.heidt@elwoodstaffing.com

ELWOOD STAFFING EARNS DUAL BEST OF STAFFING® DISTINCTION, IN ELITE 2% OF NATION

Image

(Columbus, Ind.) February 25, 2014—Elwood Staffing announced today that it has been named to Inavero’s Best of Staffing® Client and Best of Staffing® Talent lists for 2014.

Presented in partnership with CareerBuilder, Best of Staffing is the nation’s only award that recognizes staffing firms that receive remarkable reviews from their clients and the people they find jobs (employed talent). Fewer than 2% of North American staffing firms receive the Best of Staffing Award for service excellence, and fewer still earn the distinction to be on both the Client and Talent lists.

“For us, delivering exceptional customer service is not just part of our business, it is our business,” comments Elwood Staffing CEO, Mark S. Elwood. “Our success as a company hinges on the relationships we forge with our clients and associates. We are fortunate to have many long-term partnerships, and the fact that our customers say they would recommend us to their friends and colleagues is something we are very proud of.”

Best of Staffing Survey:
Staffing firms competing to make the Best of Staffing lists underwent a rigorous client survey process followed by careful analysis of responses to determine satisfaction levels in regards to customer care, communication, and overall service provided. Elwood Staffing secured a place on the list by earning an average score that was double the national staffing industry benchmark for customer satisfaction.

“The staffing industry is helping organizations bridge the skills gap and add jobs today more than at any other point in U.S. history,” said Inavero Founder and CEO, Eric Gregg. “In an era of scarce qualified talent, hard-to-fill positions, and ever-increasing expectations, these firms have proven they have what it takes to deliver exceptional service to both clients and job candidates. We’re
proud of the accomplishments of our 2014 award recipients.

“Inavero’s complete Best of Staffing list can be viewed at www.bestofstaffing.com. For more information about Inavero, visit www.inavero.com.

About Elwood Staffing:
Founded in 1980, Elwood Staffing® is a leading provider of talent-based solutions. With offices that span the United States and extend into Canada, a broad service portfolio, and a seasoned staff, we support companies through the entire employment life cycle—from attraction to outplacement. 

And with the combined expertise of our specialized sister brands—Elwood Professional, Elwood Tradesmen, and Elwood Academy—we offer a uniquely comprehensive and innovative solution set that effectively meets the needs of our clients and associates.

Information on Elwood Staffing and its service offerings can be found on its website: www.elwoodstaffing.com.

2013 CFO OF THE YEAR: Steve Hunnicutt, Elwood Staffing

2013 CFO OF THE YEAR: Steve Hunnicutt, Elwood Staffing

hunnicutt-steve-1col

HONOREE, Private Companies (Revenue $100 million or more)

As CFO of Elwood staffing, Steve Hunnicutt’s influence has been much more than temporary.

He’s overseen eight acquisitions, doubling the company’s footprint and its revenue. The achievement is even more remarkable considering that three of those acquisitions occurred in the difficult economic years from 2008 to 2010—when his industry contracted 37 percent. And he’s kept the company profitable during every year of his tenure.

Hunnicutt was recruited to serve as controller after working with an automotive-parts supplier as a business analyst. That previous employer had just gone through a merger, usually a volatile time.

“I thought it was not a bad idea to hear what these folks at Elwood had to say,” Hunnicutt recalled. Liking what he heard, he joined the family-owned business in 2000.

READ FULL STORY HERE:

Mark S. Elwood, CEO, Elwood Staffing

Staffing Industry Analysts 100 Most Influential People in the Staffing Industry 

Mark S. Elwood

Mark S. Elwood
Elwood Staffing
CEO

si100  Nominated  2013

Mark S. Elwood is CEO of Elwood Staffing, a Columbus, Ind.-based staffing firm. Elwood oversaw the acquisition of SOS Employment Group, which catapulted the staffing firm to the No. 15 slot on Staffing Industry Analysts’ 2013 list of largest U.S. staffing firms in 2013. Elwood joined the firm in 1985 and became CEO in 2000. The company operates 220 service locations across 31 states and extends into Canada.

Elwood Professional Recruiter

Elwood Professional Recruiter

Recruiter

Grand Rapids, MI
Columbus, IN 

Can you confidently communicate with clients, ask for referrals, and handle the pressure of working in a fast-paced environment? Do you enjoy speaking with and working with professionals from varied backgrounds? Do you continuously stay up to date with latest technology and trends in social media? Do you thrive in a competitive environment? Perfect! We would love to speak with you!

Elwood Professional is the Engineering, IT and Business Management placement division of Elwood Staffing, through superior customer service, dedication and the utilization of a proven recruiting process, Elwood Professional has gained the trust of our clients and candidates alike. Our expertise has enabled us to successfully help our clients and candidates achieve their goals. As an Elwood Professional Recruiter, you will be a key player and contributor to a company that directly rewards those who produce results. We will provide you with the training, processes and tools necessary to become a successful recruiter. This position has unlimited earning and growth potential within a growing industry and company.
Recruiters will report to and work closely with senior management to develop and implement recruiting strategies. The recruiters will utilize the Elwood Professional recruiting process to manage and direct their daily activity. It is necessary to be adept with a wide variety of recruiting sources. Successful recruiters will have the stamina to perform intensive phone work to build lasting relationships with clients and candidates alike.
Our recruiters are expected to contribute and perform in an environment of high morale, motivation, and teamwork. They will uphold our company Key Beliefs of Quality, Relationships, Responsiveness, Flexibility, and Progress. If these are qualities you possess, Elwood Professional is the place for you.

Key Competencies:

Industry comprehension – Knowledgeable about the professional staffing industry and how to make an impact
Drive and ambition – Driven to succeed and willing to put in the effort to make it happen
Technologically intuitive – Ability to understand technology and keep up to date with trends and changes
Personable – Ability to build rapport with new people while focusing on continuously building, developing, and maintaining relationships
Professional – Maintain a high standard of professional ethics, behavior and work activities
Process driven – Commitment to utilize a proven process in order to achieve the greatest results
Inquisitive – Curious about people and technology
Superior communicator – Excellent written and verbal communication skills
Teamwork – Is a team player and recognizes that greater successes will come from working together
Work ethic – Posses a strong willingness to work hard and sometimes long hours to get the job done and demonstrates enthusiasm when completing the tasks at hand

Desired Skills & Experience:

  • Bachelor degree from an accredited university
  • Previous success in business development or account management role with measurable KPI’s
  • General familiarity with any of the following: engineering, supply chain, manufacturing, accounting, finance or IT
  • Ability to quickly learn and master the use of multiple technical resources including but not limited to: office productivity tools, social media outlets, and applicant tracking systems
  • Ability to work independently and as a part of a team in a competitive, fast-paced environment
  • Honesty, integrity and a strong work ethic
  • Excellent problem solving, communication (oral and written), and organizational skills
  • Willing and able to work above and beyond a traditional work schedule to achieve results
  • Ability to travel as needed

To apply, submit cover letter and resume to angela.malagon@elwoodstaffing.com
A cover letter detailing your abilities and why you should be considered a top candidate is required to apply for this position.

Learn more about Elwood Professional on our website http://www.elwoodprofessional.com. We are an equal opportunity employer.

Elwood Staffing – Internal Openings July 16, 2013

Image

At Elwood Staffing, we believe that people are our most valuable resource. That’s why we are constantly working hard to recruit the best candidates for our corporate positions.  To view and apply for our internal openings, visit www.ElwoodCareers.com. Elwood Staffing is an equal opportunity employer. 

Business Development
Area Sales Consultant 
Gadsden, AL
Montgomery, AL
Norcross, GA
Lansing, MI
Arlington, TX
Roanoke, VA
Lafayette, IN
Lansing, MI

Management
Branch Manager
Lafayette, IN
South Bend, IN
Reno, NV

Customer Service Manager
Goshen, IN

Recruiter
Elwood Professional
Columbus, IN
Grand Rapids, MI

Bilingual Recruiter
Indianapolis, IN 

Experience vs Fresh Graduate

There has been some confusion among the workplace and job seekers on whether companies will, or should, hire young individuals right out of college or hire/keep the older, more experienced employee. Being a senior in college, my worry of getting hired right after graduation has skyrocketed. Why would businesses hire a freshly graduated job seeker when they could have a more experienced one? If I were up against a more experienced worker that is currently unemployed, would they even consider me? Naturally, instead of looking at the positives I looked toward the negatives first.

The older workforce would tell you that younger workers are generally lazier than their more experienced peers. They are constantly attached to their phones and social media sites. Erica Tevis owner of littlethingsfavors and LittleThingsBaby.com said, “From my experience hiring younger individuals, they don’t take the job as seriously as older individuals do – whether they take liberties such as coming in late or asking to leave early – to coming into the job hungover from a night of partying – to continually texting and using their own social media during work hours.“

Recent graduates and younger employees often come into a job with a mindset of changing the rules and attempt to manipulate the situation to suit their own needs. Many lack the maturity to adapt to the way that corporate America works. The result, more job hoppers. Whats worse, companies are investing time, money, and resources to train these people who ultimately have a higher turnover rate than their more experienced peers. Sandra Holtzman, president and founder of Holtzman communications LLC states, “Additionally, in a small business I do not have time to train or teach someone fresh out of school. Someone fresh out of school is often still dealing with learning how to work in a business environment in addition to having to learn the job.”

Even though hiring younger job seekers is often perceived as challenging, I was put at ease when discovering that “older” or more experienced employees are not so perfect either. “People with more experience tend to have a lot of bad habits, and in a corporation where one has systems put in place, young people are much easier to mold and tend to learn much faster.” stated Alexander Cross, owner of a Law-firm in the San Francisco Bay Area. It is often difficult to break these habits if one already has them programmed into their routine. More experienced people tend to be stuck in their ways and adjusting in a new working environment could be difficult.

We’ve always heard that the college you attend, the degree you earn, and what you do with that really matters. “Education and experience might be a tipping point in granting an interview – but as far as hiring, they are not as important.” said Corey Leff, CEO and Founder of spendLO. She then goes on to say “Being a small business, it is important that everyone be able to interact well together and work well as a team. Personality and fit within the goals of our company are crucial.” At the end of the day, it’s ultimately up to the hiring manager to determine what’s important, what’s not, and who’s the best fit for the company.

Maturity? Reliability? Does it matter? Joseph Sherman, Editor and Social Media Manager said “Companies that overlook older employees because of their age may be losing years of experience and wisdom.” Experienced workers are looking to build a “career” with one company, rather than jump around between them. Also, I have found that they are more committed to tasks and are less likely to take off or show up late. “Unlike 20-somethings that have their eye on the door and the next rung up, experienced executive assistants (once called secretaries) are looking more for security and fulfilling work.” said Julie D. Taylor, owner of a PR firm.

So what are the benefits of looking towards a younger job seeker? Recent college grads are typically enthusiastic about starting a new chapter in their lives. They are entering the workforce on a mission to change the world. Along with constantly offering up new ideas, being well versed in the latest technologies and trends, and passionate about taking on new challenges, today’s college graduate can be a huge asset to a company. Another advantage of hiring a younger candidate is their vast knowledge in social media. My generation truly understands the power behind social networking and what it can do for a company. We can uncover what methods are not being utilized, how to engage better with a younger audience, and the details behind the technology. Hire a newbie today:)

And the controversy goes on. What makes college graduates and other job seekers so frustrated and confused? The best answer: not having any answers. Sure, the older workforce can tout “experience”, but the younger generation can tout “youth perspective” and together we can provide true balance to the workplace. Mrs. Shilonda Downing, business owner, agreed saying, “ I think that both offer key elements for a successful team and each can learn from the other. If you have a company that is one sided, you’re truly missing out on opportunities to grow and advance your business.”

So for all the college graduates out there who are worried you won’t get hired, stop worrying and stay focused. Companies are less concerned about age and more interested in your ability to fit into their corporate culture with good work ethic, personality, and values. Stick with me, and you’re golden!

Written By: Dana Carroll

10 unusual interview mistakes, and 6 that are all too common

Most of us can recall an embarrassing moment in our lives that was caused by nerves. Whether it was drawing a blank at a crucial time, spilling a drink on a first date or stuttering through a presentation at work, at one point or another, anxiety has gotten the best of all of us.

One of life’s most notoriously nerve-racking events, the job interview, is perfect for these sorts of foot-in-mouth moments. The combination of excitement and pressure can cloud our judgment and lead us to make mistakes, decisions and comments that we wouldn’t normally make.

Making mistakes is part of being human, and most hiring managers will let the occasional blank stare or fumbled sentence slide during an interview. But there are some slip-ups that you just can’t recover from, mistakes so ridiculous that they’ll completely eclipse any potential you may have in the mind of your interviewer.

What kind of mistakes, you ask? Well, mistakes like the ones below, which hiring managers reported to CareerBuilder as the most unusual interview mishaps they’d ever seen. (Though we’re not certain all of these mistakes were caused by nerves, we’re going to give everyone the benefit of the doubt here — mostly because we can’t bear to think otherwise.)

  • Candidate brought a “how to interview book” with him to the interview.
  • Candidate asked, “What company is this again?
  • Candidate put the interviewer on hold during a phone interview. When she came back on the line, she told the interviewer that she had a date set up for Friday.
  • Candidate wore a Boy Scout uniform and never told interviewers why.
  • Candidate talked about promptness as one of her strengths after showing up 10 minutes late.
  • On the way to the interview, candidate passed, cut off and flipped the middle finger to a driver who happened to be the interviewer.
  • Candidate referred to himself in the third person.
  • Candidate took off his shoes during interview.
  • Candidate asked for a sip of the interviewer’s coffee.
  • A mature candidate told the interviewer she wasn’t sure if the job offered was worth “starting the car for.”

How’s that for some third-party embarrassment?

But before you ask, “What kind of idiot would ask a stranger for a sip of his coffee?” know that it doesn’t take a mistake as bizarre as the examples above to kill a perfectly good interview. There are a plenty of less ridiculous but equally detrimental interview gaffes that job candidates — even smart ones — make all the time.

According to the CareerBuilder survey, the following are the errors job seekers make most often:

  • Answering cell phone or texting: 77 percent
  • Appearing disinterested: 75 percent
  • Dressing inappropriately: 72 percent
  • Appearing arrogant: 72 percent
  • Talking negatively about current or previous employers: 67 percent
  • Chewing gum: 63 percent

So how can you avoid making mistakes — outrageous or otherwise — in your next job interview?

Be prepared, says Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder. “With preparation and practice, candidates can greatly improve their interview skills,” she says. Well-prepared job seekers are more confident, articulate and relaxed — and therefore less susceptible to error — than those who aren’t.

Before your interview, research the company, conduct mock interviews with friends and practice telling anecdotes that highlight your accomplishments, Haefner suggests.

Originally Posted on CareerBuilder – For even more tips on successful interviewing, check out the video posted by The Work Buzz.

8 Traits of Successful Talent Leaders

What makes a person an outstanding talent leader? Is it the ability to set a vision, develop a strategy, or manage a budget? Or is it something much less visible and subtler?

Leadership is not something we are born with, although we may have a general aptitude. It takes insight into what leadership is all about and the desire to practice it in a deliberate, thoughtful, and consistent way to become good.

The points below amplify what I have learned from many successful leaders over the years.

Rule #1: You Are Not a Recruiter Anymore

Leaders cannot be technical experts and expect their functions to be great. Good leadership is much more about setting the stage for success, garnering support and resources, and assembling teams that excel.

Most recruiting and talent leaders spend too much time doing what they are familiar with, rather than practicing the skills of leadership. It is always easy to justify jumping in to help out, to keep a few requisitions for yourself, and to train recruiters in the skills you have.

But this is not leading — it is doing.

Rule #2: Keep It Lean

All business has been focused on reducing waste, speeding up delivery times, reducing labor costs, and building in automation. Manufacturing, in particular, is more efficient and productive than ever before. This is partly the cause of the current unemployment around the globe, as fewer people are needed to do even more work than before. The service sector lags in achieving these goals, but is on the path leading to greater productivity.

Successful leaders find ways to do more with fewer people by improving efficiency and streamlining processes. Functions that focus on these will gain business leader respect and support.

Specific actions include reducing paperwork, reducing process steps, implementing technology, cutting out meetings, removing management layers, or reducing reporting.

Rule #3: Focus on Simplicity

A recruiting function should operation like an iPad. It should look and be easy to understand and be so easy for a hiring manager to hire someone who they think they did it all themselves.

Easy and simple does not mean lazy, basic, or stripped down. It means something elegantly suited for its function and doing no more or less than is needed. An Apple iPad, for example, has almost no external buttons, and has an interface so simple one needs no instructions on how to use it. It has no operation manual because it is so simple. Yet, beneath that simplicity is a very complex and difficult-to-understand series of chips, wires, batteries, and displays.

Your job is to keep the sourcing, screening, and interviewing pieces humming quietly — honed to be highly efficient. The hiring manager should see only the output of these pieces — a qualified candidate who is eager for the position.

Effective leaders should remove the things that inhibit sharing and communication (including recruiters who won’t share candidates or information). They should ruthlessly look for ways to make doing something easier, faster, and cheaper.

Rule #4: Get Out of the Way

Micromanagement is a scourge. Great leaders set the tone, hire good people, provide development and mentorship, and let them do their job unhindered. If a recruiter needs constant supervision, that recruiter should be replaced. If you have established guidelines and hire smart, capable people then your job is to create the environment where they can thrive.

You are a micromanager if you feel the need to hold regular meetings with a recruiter or group of recruiters to make sure they are making progress. You are a micromanager if you require weekly/monthly reports, if you are not comfortable being gone for a few days, and if you feel angry when decisions are made without consulting you.

Rule #5: Embrace Teams — Not Individuals

Collaboration and teamwork are more effective in getting results than individuals. Don’t organize into functional silos with sourcers, screeners, recruiters, and so on. If you have specialists, mingle them together to create cross-functional teams. Include hiring managers and business leaders on your teams whenever you can.

If you look at your job as providing the best talent — not as filling requisitions — then your recruiters and the hiring managers should engage in discussions about what type of candidates to look for and even work together on the best ways to find them.

Rise above the transactional mindset to one of making a strategic difference.  Challenge a team to better identify what kind of talent is needed and become efficient in finding and hiring these types of people. Make all rewards based on team performance. Encourage sharing, cross learning, and leveraging each persons’ skills.

Rule #6: Accept the Limits

There is never enough of anything. In decades in the recruitment world I have never heard anyone say they had all the money, time, or people they needed to do their job. And I am pretty sure I never will.

Rather than complain, use the limits to your advantage. When there are not enough people, learn other ways to get a task done. It may require out-of-the-box thinking and may even require you to get a team together to brainstorm some possible solutions.

Rule #7: Build Internal Relationships

Relationships are the key to success and happiness in every social setting, and organizations are social settings. Getting to know and support your own leadership team will help remove constraints and perhaps even provide more resources.

Spending time to chat with business leaders, and getting to know them and their problems and needs, will help you to focus your efforts, redirect priorities, and improve your relevance.

Good relationships clarify communications, help overcome misunderstandings, and streamline getting though bureaucracy. Talent leaders should spend almost half their time building internal relationships, offering talent-related information and analytics, and showing how better candidates and better hires lead to greater profits.

Rule #8: Use Technology; Don’t Fall in Love with It

Using technology well is the key to increasing productivity, but do not forget that recruiting is a people-to-people business. Relationships — virtual or face-to-face — are the basis for generating interest in a position and in getting hiring managers to accept candidates you send to them.

Technology helps immensely and increases productivity and expands the reach of your recruiters and provides data and insights you would not get otherwise. But it does not replace the need for recruiters to continuously refine their ability to connect with candidates and convince them of the opportunity offered. Nor does it replace the face-to-face conversations with hiring managers that build the credibility of your department and improves candidate acceptance.

Technology is always advancing, so look at each new app or solution and see where it might fit in a process flow. What would it enhance? What would it replace? Does it seem useful in achieving one of the leadership goals I have mentioned above?

But remember that most of all your job is to set the stage for success and do everything you can to make sure your recruiters have the skills, tools, and empowerment to achieve the goals of the organization.

This  article was originally written by Kevin Wheeler for ere.net