Twitter recruiting

The Role of Social Media in Recruiting

social_linkedin_box_blueSocial Media is emerging as a tool that more recruiters rely on in the hiring process. Networks such as LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Viadeo, and Google+ can provide recruiters with an array of information about potential candidates, as well as new avenues for reaching passive candidates and advertising the company’s current openings.

Many companies with a large web presence build out their brand not only on their own corporate website, but also on these Social Media sites. This provides an extended reach whereby companies can further share information about who they are and the available job opportunities with interested job seekers. Many of these networks include special job posting pages, making it easier for visitors to locate those jobs that interest them.

In addition to your company presence on Social Media sites, the world of networking opens up the ability for your current employees and recruiting team members to share these job opportunities with people in their network.

Social Media can have an increased impact on how your company finds potential candidates by providing greater visibility of potential opportunities for growth to passive candidates (those who are not actively searching for a job). Instead of relying heavily on external recruitment firms or job boards, many companies are focusing on locating specialized talent through Social Media sites such as LinkedIn.

With both passive and active candidates, recruiters also have access to a wealth of information about candidates on Social Media sites. Depending on the site, quite a bit of information about candidates is public and can include work history, personal interests or network size. It can be useful – particularly with candidates who directly interact with customers,  like sales – in determining the size of their network and what potential market growth can this person bring to the organization through their personal connections.  It also shows how these individuals portray themselves outside of your company’s standard hiring processes.

As Social Media sites continue to evolve, the role of these sites in recruitment may develop in ways that we cannot yet imagine. Whether or not you want to use this information in your recruiting process may be determined by the industry of your organization or your company’s legal department.

It is often difficult to come up with a Social Media strategy because the market shifts so rapidly and often defies targeted efforts. However, it is a mistake to not jump on the Social Media bandwagon and start utilizing these free tools! Finding a way to include Social Media in your recruiting process is a win-win for both your company and potential candidates.

AUTHORS Andy Najjar and Judy Fort of HRsmart

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Tidbits for your Career Search

There is an overwhelming amount of advice and information out there for job seekers that it’s almost impossible to know where to begin.  As an internal recruiter, the things that I look for in a resume just scratches the surface into what HR and other hiring managers may look for but here are my top ‘tidbits’ of advice.

1. Pay attention to the details! Now Hiring-Purple (2)Words that are spelled correctly but used in the wrong context are easily overlooked because spell checker will not notice them. Have at least 3 qualified people review your resume and provide feedback. There is not a ‘right way’ to do a resume. Every hiring manager will have their own preferences so the more feedback you get, the better. Also, triple check those cover
letters. It’s so convenient to copy and paste so be sure that you have not submitted
the name or position of a previous application to your next. I will immediately
dismiss an applicant who has submitted a cover letter that is customized for
someone else’s job posting.

2. It is a social media age of recruiting. You must have a professional LinkedIn profile and make it look like your resume. Dates and job duties should mirror one another. Then start connecting with people. Don’t reach out to VP’s and CEO’s of companies asking for jobs. You should start with recruiters, managers, staff, and NEVER come out and ask directly for a job. This is a networking site so be professional. Also, MAKE YOUR PERSONAL SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS PRIVATE. Every job seeker should go in and adjust the privacy settings on Facebook, MySpace, Instagram, and so on. Google yourself and see what shows up. Hiring managers are researching and you don’t want us to see what you and your friends do outside of your professional life.

3. Always keep your up-to-date resume on relevant job boards including CareerBuilder and Monster. Include relevant keywords without overdoing it. Your key words should match your experience so don’t try to fool us. Pay attention to the headline on your profile and make it
relevant to the job that you are seeking. When we conduct a search, we skim through quickly. You will want to catch our attention with those few words. Management graduate seeking and entry-level position, Sales professional, etc…

4. When you get the call for an interview, prepare! Research the interviewer,
the company, and the industry. Practice interview questions, both standard and
behavioral (you can find some on the internet). Be ready to talk about future
goals both long and short-term. Study for your interview.

I find a lot of tips and useful information on CareerBuilder and Monster that I share on my
LinkedIn and Twitter accounts.

CareerBuilder has a great section on their website called “Advice and Resources.” http://www.careerbuilder.com/JobSeeker/Resources/CareerResources.aspx?sc_cmp2=JS_Nav_AdvRes

Monster has their own version of job seeker resources called “Career Resources.” http://resources.monster.com/?re=nv_gh_gnt1377_%2F

Both sites provide wonderful resources for job seekers at any level.  Take advantage of the resources that are available to you.  It could better prepare you and set you apart from other job seekers.

Best of luck on your career endeavors!

Angela Malagon, Corporate Recruiter, Elwood Staffing Services, Inc.

Twitter Recruiting

Utilizing Twitter as a tool for social recruiting is often times misunderstood. There are some things you should consider before determining if Twitter could benefit your recruitment strategy.

1. Is your market and book of business large enough to support a following?
If your organization is too narrow, you may not see the return that you expect from Twitter. Those who recruit in multiple markets, with diverse opportunities will see more followers. Don’t let this discourage you. It is good to have a small amount of targeted followers rather than a large following of diluted ones. You can grow your follwers by following others. Search for people to follow by industy or location (search.twitter.com) and follow candidates, other recruiters, and clients.

2. Do your people use Twitter?
This is a tough question to answer. Not every job seeker, in every market uses Twitter. You have to keep in mind that you are not trying to reach every job seeker. You are trying to reach that perfect candidate. Twitter is a tool to help you, it is not the end all of recruiting. Using hash tags # will help job seekers find you. Just don’t overuse your hash tags. Hash tags like #jobs #engineering #staffing, along with the location of the opportuinty, will help target your post in a search. The best way to learn how to post is to search like a job seeker. Log into Twitter and search like a candidate. See what other recrutiers are doing and how they are posting. You can learn a lot from your peers.

3. What is the purpose of using Twitter?
Twitter has multiple purposes and they need to all be utilized in order to be effective. First and foremost, you want to broadcast your job openings. You are a recruiter so your followers should expect to see your job postings. You can save time by utilizing recruiting software to set up an automated schedule. Over time, your followers will not remain active job seekers – they will become ‘retweeters’ sending you great referrals- so you don’t want to run them off. This is why you need to Tweet other engaging information. Please do not Tweet ultra personal information. While you want to portray a human side, save the private information and drunk Tweeting for your personal Twitter. Tweet interesting facts, artices, and tips related to jobs, company, or industry. You can also engage followers by posting trivia and asking questions. Just remember to follow up on iquiries and responses. Having a healthy mix of interaction will make you a good social recruiter and a promote you as an industry professional. You can also use Twitter to market yourself and your company. Tweet interesting facts, history, and press releases that surround you and your company.

4. Do you have time to Tweet on a consistent basis?
Consistency is key in the fast moving world of Twitter. If you want to stay relevant, you have to stay in the conversation. I do not recieve my biggest return of inquiries from Twitter, nor do I connect with as many industry profesionals as I do on other social media sites. For this reason, I do not devote as much of my time to Twitter. I like Twitter because it allows me another avenue to post jobs, give advice, and market my brand with little time and no additional cost to my company. With tools such as Bullhorn Reach and HootSuite, I can schedule my job postings and engaging content in advance and then move on with my traditional daily duties.

There are many critics to the usefulness of Twitter. I do not compare Twitter to other social media sites and job boards like; Facebook, LinkedIn, CareerBuilder, and Monster. Job boards are the best way to reach active candidates while social media sites are a great addition to find passive ones. You have to have a good mix of recruiting tools and invest your time in the ones that are most effective for you.

Angela Malagon
Corporate Recruiter, Elwood Staffing