social recruiting

The Role of Social Media in Recruiting

social_linkedin_box_blueSocial Media is emerging as a tool that more recruiters rely on in the hiring process. Networks such as LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Viadeo, and Google+ can provide recruiters with an array of information about potential candidates, as well as new avenues for reaching passive candidates and advertising the company’s current openings.

Many companies with a large web presence build out their brand not only on their own corporate website, but also on these Social Media sites. This provides an extended reach whereby companies can further share information about who they are and the available job opportunities with interested job seekers. Many of these networks include special job posting pages, making it easier for visitors to locate those jobs that interest them.

In addition to your company presence on Social Media sites, the world of networking opens up the ability for your current employees and recruiting team members to share these job opportunities with people in their network.

Social Media can have an increased impact on how your company finds potential candidates by providing greater visibility of potential opportunities for growth to passive candidates (those who are not actively searching for a job). Instead of relying heavily on external recruitment firms or job boards, many companies are focusing on locating specialized talent through Social Media sites such as LinkedIn.

With both passive and active candidates, recruiters also have access to a wealth of information about candidates on Social Media sites. Depending on the site, quite a bit of information about candidates is public and can include work history, personal interests or network size. It can be useful – particularly with candidates who directly interact with customers,  like sales – in determining the size of their network and what potential market growth can this person bring to the organization through their personal connections.  It also shows how these individuals portray themselves outside of your company’s standard hiring processes.

As Social Media sites continue to evolve, the role of these sites in recruitment may develop in ways that we cannot yet imagine. Whether or not you want to use this information in your recruiting process may be determined by the industry of your organization or your company’s legal department.

It is often difficult to come up with a Social Media strategy because the market shifts so rapidly and often defies targeted efforts. However, it is a mistake to not jump on the Social Media bandwagon and start utilizing these free tools! Finding a way to include Social Media in your recruiting process is a win-win for both your company and potential candidates.

AUTHORS Andy Najjar and Judy Fort of HRsmart

Advertisements

8 Traits of Successful Talent Leaders

What makes a person an outstanding talent leader? Is it the ability to set a vision, develop a strategy, or manage a budget? Or is it something much less visible and subtler?

Leadership is not something we are born with, although we may have a general aptitude. It takes insight into what leadership is all about and the desire to practice it in a deliberate, thoughtful, and consistent way to become good.

The points below amplify what I have learned from many successful leaders over the years.

Rule #1: You Are Not a Recruiter Anymore

Leaders cannot be technical experts and expect their functions to be great. Good leadership is much more about setting the stage for success, garnering support and resources, and assembling teams that excel.

Most recruiting and talent leaders spend too much time doing what they are familiar with, rather than practicing the skills of leadership. It is always easy to justify jumping in to help out, to keep a few requisitions for yourself, and to train recruiters in the skills you have.

But this is not leading — it is doing.

Rule #2: Keep It Lean

All business has been focused on reducing waste, speeding up delivery times, reducing labor costs, and building in automation. Manufacturing, in particular, is more efficient and productive than ever before. This is partly the cause of the current unemployment around the globe, as fewer people are needed to do even more work than before. The service sector lags in achieving these goals, but is on the path leading to greater productivity.

Successful leaders find ways to do more with fewer people by improving efficiency and streamlining processes. Functions that focus on these will gain business leader respect and support.

Specific actions include reducing paperwork, reducing process steps, implementing technology, cutting out meetings, removing management layers, or reducing reporting.

Rule #3: Focus on Simplicity

A recruiting function should operation like an iPad. It should look and be easy to understand and be so easy for a hiring manager to hire someone who they think they did it all themselves.

Easy and simple does not mean lazy, basic, or stripped down. It means something elegantly suited for its function and doing no more or less than is needed. An Apple iPad, for example, has almost no external buttons, and has an interface so simple one needs no instructions on how to use it. It has no operation manual because it is so simple. Yet, beneath that simplicity is a very complex and difficult-to-understand series of chips, wires, batteries, and displays.

Your job is to keep the sourcing, screening, and interviewing pieces humming quietly — honed to be highly efficient. The hiring manager should see only the output of these pieces — a qualified candidate who is eager for the position.

Effective leaders should remove the things that inhibit sharing and communication (including recruiters who won’t share candidates or information). They should ruthlessly look for ways to make doing something easier, faster, and cheaper.

Rule #4: Get Out of the Way

Micromanagement is a scourge. Great leaders set the tone, hire good people, provide development and mentorship, and let them do their job unhindered. If a recruiter needs constant supervision, that recruiter should be replaced. If you have established guidelines and hire smart, capable people then your job is to create the environment where they can thrive.

You are a micromanager if you feel the need to hold regular meetings with a recruiter or group of recruiters to make sure they are making progress. You are a micromanager if you require weekly/monthly reports, if you are not comfortable being gone for a few days, and if you feel angry when decisions are made without consulting you.

Rule #5: Embrace Teams — Not Individuals

Collaboration and teamwork are more effective in getting results than individuals. Don’t organize into functional silos with sourcers, screeners, recruiters, and so on. If you have specialists, mingle them together to create cross-functional teams. Include hiring managers and business leaders on your teams whenever you can.

If you look at your job as providing the best talent — not as filling requisitions — then your recruiters and the hiring managers should engage in discussions about what type of candidates to look for and even work together on the best ways to find them.

Rise above the transactional mindset to one of making a strategic difference.  Challenge a team to better identify what kind of talent is needed and become efficient in finding and hiring these types of people. Make all rewards based on team performance. Encourage sharing, cross learning, and leveraging each persons’ skills.

Rule #6: Accept the Limits

There is never enough of anything. In decades in the recruitment world I have never heard anyone say they had all the money, time, or people they needed to do their job. And I am pretty sure I never will.

Rather than complain, use the limits to your advantage. When there are not enough people, learn other ways to get a task done. It may require out-of-the-box thinking and may even require you to get a team together to brainstorm some possible solutions.

Rule #7: Build Internal Relationships

Relationships are the key to success and happiness in every social setting, and organizations are social settings. Getting to know and support your own leadership team will help remove constraints and perhaps even provide more resources.

Spending time to chat with business leaders, and getting to know them and their problems and needs, will help you to focus your efforts, redirect priorities, and improve your relevance.

Good relationships clarify communications, help overcome misunderstandings, and streamline getting though bureaucracy. Talent leaders should spend almost half their time building internal relationships, offering talent-related information and analytics, and showing how better candidates and better hires lead to greater profits.

Rule #8: Use Technology; Don’t Fall in Love with It

Using technology well is the key to increasing productivity, but do not forget that recruiting is a people-to-people business. Relationships — virtual or face-to-face — are the basis for generating interest in a position and in getting hiring managers to accept candidates you send to them.

Technology helps immensely and increases productivity and expands the reach of your recruiters and provides data and insights you would not get otherwise. But it does not replace the need for recruiters to continuously refine their ability to connect with candidates and convince them of the opportunity offered. Nor does it replace the face-to-face conversations with hiring managers that build the credibility of your department and improves candidate acceptance.

Technology is always advancing, so look at each new app or solution and see where it might fit in a process flow. What would it enhance? What would it replace? Does it seem useful in achieving one of the leadership goals I have mentioned above?

But remember that most of all your job is to set the stage for success and do everything you can to make sure your recruiters have the skills, tools, and empowerment to achieve the goals of the organization.

This  article was originally written by Kevin Wheeler for ere.net

Tidbits for your Career Search

There is an overwhelming amount of advice and information out there for job seekers that it’s almost impossible to know where to begin.  As an internal recruiter, the things that I look for in a resume just scratches the surface into what HR and other hiring managers may look for but here are my top ‘tidbits’ of advice.

1. Pay attention to the details! Now Hiring-Purple (2)Words that are spelled correctly but used in the wrong context are easily overlooked because spell checker will not notice them. Have at least 3 qualified people review your resume and provide feedback. There is not a ‘right way’ to do a resume. Every hiring manager will have their own preferences so the more feedback you get, the better. Also, triple check those cover
letters. It’s so convenient to copy and paste so be sure that you have not submitted
the name or position of a previous application to your next. I will immediately
dismiss an applicant who has submitted a cover letter that is customized for
someone else’s job posting.

2. It is a social media age of recruiting. You must have a professional LinkedIn profile and make it look like your resume. Dates and job duties should mirror one another. Then start connecting with people. Don’t reach out to VP’s and CEO’s of companies asking for jobs. You should start with recruiters, managers, staff, and NEVER come out and ask directly for a job. This is a networking site so be professional. Also, MAKE YOUR PERSONAL SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS PRIVATE. Every job seeker should go in and adjust the privacy settings on Facebook, MySpace, Instagram, and so on. Google yourself and see what shows up. Hiring managers are researching and you don’t want us to see what you and your friends do outside of your professional life.

3. Always keep your up-to-date resume on relevant job boards including CareerBuilder and Monster. Include relevant keywords without overdoing it. Your key words should match your experience so don’t try to fool us. Pay attention to the headline on your profile and make it
relevant to the job that you are seeking. When we conduct a search, we skim through quickly. You will want to catch our attention with those few words. Management graduate seeking and entry-level position, Sales professional, etc…

4. When you get the call for an interview, prepare! Research the interviewer,
the company, and the industry. Practice interview questions, both standard and
behavioral (you can find some on the internet). Be ready to talk about future
goals both long and short-term. Study for your interview.

I find a lot of tips and useful information on CareerBuilder and Monster that I share on my
LinkedIn and Twitter accounts.

CareerBuilder has a great section on their website called “Advice and Resources.” http://www.careerbuilder.com/JobSeeker/Resources/CareerResources.aspx?sc_cmp2=JS_Nav_AdvRes

Monster has their own version of job seeker resources called “Career Resources.” http://resources.monster.com/?re=nv_gh_gnt1377_%2F

Both sites provide wonderful resources for job seekers at any level.  Take advantage of the resources that are available to you.  It could better prepare you and set you apart from other job seekers.

Best of luck on your career endeavors!

Angela Malagon, Corporate Recruiter, Elwood Staffing Services, Inc.

Twitter Recruiting

Utilizing Twitter as a tool for social recruiting is often times misunderstood. There are some things you should consider before determining if Twitter could benefit your recruitment strategy.

1. Is your market and book of business large enough to support a following?
If your organization is too narrow, you may not see the return that you expect from Twitter. Those who recruit in multiple markets, with diverse opportunities will see more followers. Don’t let this discourage you. It is good to have a small amount of targeted followers rather than a large following of diluted ones. You can grow your follwers by following others. Search for people to follow by industy or location (search.twitter.com) and follow candidates, other recruiters, and clients.

2. Do your people use Twitter?
This is a tough question to answer. Not every job seeker, in every market uses Twitter. You have to keep in mind that you are not trying to reach every job seeker. You are trying to reach that perfect candidate. Twitter is a tool to help you, it is not the end all of recruiting. Using hash tags # will help job seekers find you. Just don’t overuse your hash tags. Hash tags like #jobs #engineering #staffing, along with the location of the opportuinty, will help target your post in a search. The best way to learn how to post is to search like a job seeker. Log into Twitter and search like a candidate. See what other recrutiers are doing and how they are posting. You can learn a lot from your peers.

3. What is the purpose of using Twitter?
Twitter has multiple purposes and they need to all be utilized in order to be effective. First and foremost, you want to broadcast your job openings. You are a recruiter so your followers should expect to see your job postings. You can save time by utilizing recruiting software to set up an automated schedule. Over time, your followers will not remain active job seekers – they will become ‘retweeters’ sending you great referrals- so you don’t want to run them off. This is why you need to Tweet other engaging information. Please do not Tweet ultra personal information. While you want to portray a human side, save the private information and drunk Tweeting for your personal Twitter. Tweet interesting facts, artices, and tips related to jobs, company, or industry. You can also engage followers by posting trivia and asking questions. Just remember to follow up on iquiries and responses. Having a healthy mix of interaction will make you a good social recruiter and a promote you as an industry professional. You can also use Twitter to market yourself and your company. Tweet interesting facts, history, and press releases that surround you and your company.

4. Do you have time to Tweet on a consistent basis?
Consistency is key in the fast moving world of Twitter. If you want to stay relevant, you have to stay in the conversation. I do not recieve my biggest return of inquiries from Twitter, nor do I connect with as many industry profesionals as I do on other social media sites. For this reason, I do not devote as much of my time to Twitter. I like Twitter because it allows me another avenue to post jobs, give advice, and market my brand with little time and no additional cost to my company. With tools such as Bullhorn Reach and HootSuite, I can schedule my job postings and engaging content in advance and then move on with my traditional daily duties.

There are many critics to the usefulness of Twitter. I do not compare Twitter to other social media sites and job boards like; Facebook, LinkedIn, CareerBuilder, and Monster. Job boards are the best way to reach active candidates while social media sites are a great addition to find passive ones. You have to have a good mix of recruiting tools and invest your time in the ones that are most effective for you.

Angela Malagon
Corporate Recruiter, Elwood Staffing