recruiting

The Role of Social Media in Recruiting

social_linkedin_box_blueSocial Media is emerging as a tool that more recruiters rely on in the hiring process. Networks such as LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Viadeo, and Google+ can provide recruiters with an array of information about potential candidates, as well as new avenues for reaching passive candidates and advertising the company’s current openings.

Many companies with a large web presence build out their brand not only on their own corporate website, but also on these Social Media sites. This provides an extended reach whereby companies can further share information about who they are and the available job opportunities with interested job seekers. Many of these networks include special job posting pages, making it easier for visitors to locate those jobs that interest them.

In addition to your company presence on Social Media sites, the world of networking opens up the ability for your current employees and recruiting team members to share these job opportunities with people in their network.

Social Media can have an increased impact on how your company finds potential candidates by providing greater visibility of potential opportunities for growth to passive candidates (those who are not actively searching for a job). Instead of relying heavily on external recruitment firms or job boards, many companies are focusing on locating specialized talent through Social Media sites such as LinkedIn.

With both passive and active candidates, recruiters also have access to a wealth of information about candidates on Social Media sites. Depending on the site, quite a bit of information about candidates is public and can include work history, personal interests or network size. It can be useful – particularly with candidates who directly interact with customers,  like sales – in determining the size of their network and what potential market growth can this person bring to the organization through their personal connections.  It also shows how these individuals portray themselves outside of your company’s standard hiring processes.

As Social Media sites continue to evolve, the role of these sites in recruitment may develop in ways that we cannot yet imagine. Whether or not you want to use this information in your recruiting process may be determined by the industry of your organization or your company’s legal department.

It is often difficult to come up with a Social Media strategy because the market shifts so rapidly and often defies targeted efforts. However, it is a mistake to not jump on the Social Media bandwagon and start utilizing these free tools! Finding a way to include Social Media in your recruiting process is a win-win for both your company and potential candidates.

AUTHORS Andy Najjar and Judy Fort of HRsmart

Advertisements

Shaky On Your Staffing Firm Knowledge?

A staffing firm is kind of like Chandler Bing’s job: everyone knows it exists – and that it’s important – but no one can really explain what it is.

In short, recruiters help match the right candidates with the right employers. While many companies have in-house HR departments, staffing and recruiting firms can help when the company’s staffing needs outweigh its recruiting resources. Because they also specialize in sourcing and screening candidates, recruiters can help you find candidates for hard-to-fill positions, even when it seems as though you’ve exhausted every possible resource.

When it comes to utilizing the services of a staffing firm, however, it’s important to first consider your unique staffing needs and recruiting goals, as different staffing and recruiting firms specialize in different things. Below are the three most common types of staffing agencies, and their various areas of expertise.

  • Permanent Staffing Agencies: Companies typically use permanent staffing agencies when they want to hire a key person, but do not want to publicize it.  Staffing firms help them search for candidates on the sly. Companies may also leverage staffing firms when other methods of in-house recruiting – job ad placement or employee referrals, for example – have proved insufficient. Recruiters specialize in proactively tracking down and finding qualified candidates.
  • Temp-to-Perm Staffing Agencies: Companies typically enlist temp-to-perm staffing agencies when they want to “try out” an employee before taking them on full time. Companies have the luxury of evaluating an employee’s performance and cultural fit before making a final hiring decision.
  • Temporary Staffing Agencies: As indicated by CareerBuilder’s most recent Hiring Forecast, more companies are planning to hire temporary and contract workers this year than in previous years. Companies typically use temporary staffing agencies for two reasons: either to fill in for a person who is out of the office for an extended period of time (such as someone on maternity leave); or to supplement staff during peak business periods that demand more help (but not enough to create a full-time posiiton). People who take temp jobs are typically either “career temps” – people who prefer the flexibility temp jobs offer over full-time jobs – or unemployed people who are trying to supplement their income with temporary work.

Looking for a staffing agency to supplement your hiring needs? Ask a colleague or industry peer for a referral. Just as it is with hiring, referrals are often your best source to find quality, trusted professionals. Another option is to start with 2013 Best of Staffing winners, who are recognized among both candidates and clients for providing excellent service in the staffing industry.

Source: CareerBuilder

Experience vs Fresh Graduate

There has been some confusion among the workplace and job seekers on whether companies will, or should, hire young individuals right out of college or hire/keep the older, more experienced employee. Being a senior in college, my worry of getting hired right after graduation has skyrocketed. Why would businesses hire a freshly graduated job seeker when they could have a more experienced one? If I were up against a more experienced worker that is currently unemployed, would they even consider me? Naturally, instead of looking at the positives I looked toward the negatives first.

The older workforce would tell you that younger workers are generally lazier than their more experienced peers. They are constantly attached to their phones and social media sites. Erica Tevis owner of littlethingsfavors and LittleThingsBaby.com said, “From my experience hiring younger individuals, they don’t take the job as seriously as older individuals do – whether they take liberties such as coming in late or asking to leave early – to coming into the job hungover from a night of partying – to continually texting and using their own social media during work hours.“

Recent graduates and younger employees often come into a job with a mindset of changing the rules and attempt to manipulate the situation to suit their own needs. Many lack the maturity to adapt to the way that corporate America works. The result, more job hoppers. Whats worse, companies are investing time, money, and resources to train these people who ultimately have a higher turnover rate than their more experienced peers. Sandra Holtzman, president and founder of Holtzman communications LLC states, “Additionally, in a small business I do not have time to train or teach someone fresh out of school. Someone fresh out of school is often still dealing with learning how to work in a business environment in addition to having to learn the job.”

Even though hiring younger job seekers is often perceived as challenging, I was put at ease when discovering that “older” or more experienced employees are not so perfect either. “People with more experience tend to have a lot of bad habits, and in a corporation where one has systems put in place, young people are much easier to mold and tend to learn much faster.” stated Alexander Cross, owner of a Law-firm in the San Francisco Bay Area. It is often difficult to break these habits if one already has them programmed into their routine. More experienced people tend to be stuck in their ways and adjusting in a new working environment could be difficult.

We’ve always heard that the college you attend, the degree you earn, and what you do with that really matters. “Education and experience might be a tipping point in granting an interview – but as far as hiring, they are not as important.” said Corey Leff, CEO and Founder of spendLO. She then goes on to say “Being a small business, it is important that everyone be able to interact well together and work well as a team. Personality and fit within the goals of our company are crucial.” At the end of the day, it’s ultimately up to the hiring manager to determine what’s important, what’s not, and who’s the best fit for the company.

Maturity? Reliability? Does it matter? Joseph Sherman, Editor and Social Media Manager said “Companies that overlook older employees because of their age may be losing years of experience and wisdom.” Experienced workers are looking to build a “career” with one company, rather than jump around between them. Also, I have found that they are more committed to tasks and are less likely to take off or show up late. “Unlike 20-somethings that have their eye on the door and the next rung up, experienced executive assistants (once called secretaries) are looking more for security and fulfilling work.” said Julie D. Taylor, owner of a PR firm.

So what are the benefits of looking towards a younger job seeker? Recent college grads are typically enthusiastic about starting a new chapter in their lives. They are entering the workforce on a mission to change the world. Along with constantly offering up new ideas, being well versed in the latest technologies and trends, and passionate about taking on new challenges, today’s college graduate can be a huge asset to a company. Another advantage of hiring a younger candidate is their vast knowledge in social media. My generation truly understands the power behind social networking and what it can do for a company. We can uncover what methods are not being utilized, how to engage better with a younger audience, and the details behind the technology. Hire a newbie today:)

And the controversy goes on. What makes college graduates and other job seekers so frustrated and confused? The best answer: not having any answers. Sure, the older workforce can tout “experience”, but the younger generation can tout “youth perspective” and together we can provide true balance to the workplace. Mrs. Shilonda Downing, business owner, agreed saying, “ I think that both offer key elements for a successful team and each can learn from the other. If you have a company that is one sided, you’re truly missing out on opportunities to grow and advance your business.”

So for all the college graduates out there who are worried you won’t get hired, stop worrying and stay focused. Companies are less concerned about age and more interested in your ability to fit into their corporate culture with good work ethic, personality, and values. Stick with me, and you’re golden!

Written By: Dana Carroll

8 Traits of Successful Talent Leaders

What makes a person an outstanding talent leader? Is it the ability to set a vision, develop a strategy, or manage a budget? Or is it something much less visible and subtler?

Leadership is not something we are born with, although we may have a general aptitude. It takes insight into what leadership is all about and the desire to practice it in a deliberate, thoughtful, and consistent way to become good.

The points below amplify what I have learned from many successful leaders over the years.

Rule #1: You Are Not a Recruiter Anymore

Leaders cannot be technical experts and expect their functions to be great. Good leadership is much more about setting the stage for success, garnering support and resources, and assembling teams that excel.

Most recruiting and talent leaders spend too much time doing what they are familiar with, rather than practicing the skills of leadership. It is always easy to justify jumping in to help out, to keep a few requisitions for yourself, and to train recruiters in the skills you have.

But this is not leading — it is doing.

Rule #2: Keep It Lean

All business has been focused on reducing waste, speeding up delivery times, reducing labor costs, and building in automation. Manufacturing, in particular, is more efficient and productive than ever before. This is partly the cause of the current unemployment around the globe, as fewer people are needed to do even more work than before. The service sector lags in achieving these goals, but is on the path leading to greater productivity.

Successful leaders find ways to do more with fewer people by improving efficiency and streamlining processes. Functions that focus on these will gain business leader respect and support.

Specific actions include reducing paperwork, reducing process steps, implementing technology, cutting out meetings, removing management layers, or reducing reporting.

Rule #3: Focus on Simplicity

A recruiting function should operation like an iPad. It should look and be easy to understand and be so easy for a hiring manager to hire someone who they think they did it all themselves.

Easy and simple does not mean lazy, basic, or stripped down. It means something elegantly suited for its function and doing no more or less than is needed. An Apple iPad, for example, has almost no external buttons, and has an interface so simple one needs no instructions on how to use it. It has no operation manual because it is so simple. Yet, beneath that simplicity is a very complex and difficult-to-understand series of chips, wires, batteries, and displays.

Your job is to keep the sourcing, screening, and interviewing pieces humming quietly — honed to be highly efficient. The hiring manager should see only the output of these pieces — a qualified candidate who is eager for the position.

Effective leaders should remove the things that inhibit sharing and communication (including recruiters who won’t share candidates or information). They should ruthlessly look for ways to make doing something easier, faster, and cheaper.

Rule #4: Get Out of the Way

Micromanagement is a scourge. Great leaders set the tone, hire good people, provide development and mentorship, and let them do their job unhindered. If a recruiter needs constant supervision, that recruiter should be replaced. If you have established guidelines and hire smart, capable people then your job is to create the environment where they can thrive.

You are a micromanager if you feel the need to hold regular meetings with a recruiter or group of recruiters to make sure they are making progress. You are a micromanager if you require weekly/monthly reports, if you are not comfortable being gone for a few days, and if you feel angry when decisions are made without consulting you.

Rule #5: Embrace Teams — Not Individuals

Collaboration and teamwork are more effective in getting results than individuals. Don’t organize into functional silos with sourcers, screeners, recruiters, and so on. If you have specialists, mingle them together to create cross-functional teams. Include hiring managers and business leaders on your teams whenever you can.

If you look at your job as providing the best talent — not as filling requisitions — then your recruiters and the hiring managers should engage in discussions about what type of candidates to look for and even work together on the best ways to find them.

Rise above the transactional mindset to one of making a strategic difference.  Challenge a team to better identify what kind of talent is needed and become efficient in finding and hiring these types of people. Make all rewards based on team performance. Encourage sharing, cross learning, and leveraging each persons’ skills.

Rule #6: Accept the Limits

There is never enough of anything. In decades in the recruitment world I have never heard anyone say they had all the money, time, or people they needed to do their job. And I am pretty sure I never will.

Rather than complain, use the limits to your advantage. When there are not enough people, learn other ways to get a task done. It may require out-of-the-box thinking and may even require you to get a team together to brainstorm some possible solutions.

Rule #7: Build Internal Relationships

Relationships are the key to success and happiness in every social setting, and organizations are social settings. Getting to know and support your own leadership team will help remove constraints and perhaps even provide more resources.

Spending time to chat with business leaders, and getting to know them and their problems and needs, will help you to focus your efforts, redirect priorities, and improve your relevance.

Good relationships clarify communications, help overcome misunderstandings, and streamline getting though bureaucracy. Talent leaders should spend almost half their time building internal relationships, offering talent-related information and analytics, and showing how better candidates and better hires lead to greater profits.

Rule #8: Use Technology; Don’t Fall in Love with It

Using technology well is the key to increasing productivity, but do not forget that recruiting is a people-to-people business. Relationships — virtual or face-to-face — are the basis for generating interest in a position and in getting hiring managers to accept candidates you send to them.

Technology helps immensely and increases productivity and expands the reach of your recruiters and provides data and insights you would not get otherwise. But it does not replace the need for recruiters to continuously refine their ability to connect with candidates and convince them of the opportunity offered. Nor does it replace the face-to-face conversations with hiring managers that build the credibility of your department and improves candidate acceptance.

Technology is always advancing, so look at each new app or solution and see where it might fit in a process flow. What would it enhance? What would it replace? Does it seem useful in achieving one of the leadership goals I have mentioned above?

But remember that most of all your job is to set the stage for success and do everything you can to make sure your recruiters have the skills, tools, and empowerment to achieve the goals of the organization.

This  article was originally written by Kevin Wheeler for ere.net

Elwood Staffing – Internal Openings

Internal Jobs

At Elwood Staffing, we believe that people are our most valuable resource. That’s why we are constantly working hard to recruit the best candidates for our corporate positions.

Corporate/Internal Openings: Area Manager Branch Manager Area Sales Consultant Customer Service Manager Staffing Specialist Bilingual Staffing Specialist Staffing Assistant Bilingual Staffing Assistant On-Site Account Manager On-Site Specialist Management Development Program

We place a high priority on attracting and retaining top talent. At Elwood Staffing, we provide each of our employees with CPR: Commitment, Progress, and Rewards.

Commitment

We are committed to providing you with a work environment that inspires you to be your best. We communicate our goals and objectives so we can work together to achieve them. We pride ourselves on listening – listening to your thoughts and suggestions of how we can improve. It means providing you with the resources you need to be successful. It means hiring people like you – equally committed to professional growth and the success of Elwood Staffing.

Progress

We are committed to providing you with opportunities to expand your knowledge and skills. We work in a challenging industry that demands our employees be provided the means of continuous professional improvement. Elwood University provides internal training opportunities such as the Certified Staffing Professional™ (CSP™) certification, a variety of software programs, employment law policies, professional development, and more. We also provide a generous tuition reimbursement program for on-line or classroom courses at accredited colleges and universities. These training tools, combined with your ambition, provide the means to expand your skills and open the door to new opportunities for you at Elwood Staffing.

Rewards

We recognize what it takes to attract good people. We do this by providing competitive salaries and benefits. Our annual bonus program rewards you for a job well done. Our gain-sharing program shares in the success of Elwood Staffing. Our 401(k) participants enjoy a generous annual match of their payroll contributions. Along with paid time off, health, dental and vision coverage, paid holidays, and more, we provide an excellent package of benefits for all of our employees.

Are you in need of a little C-P-R? If you would like to learn more about the opportunities that await you at Elwood Staffing, simply click on our available corporate position that best matches your interest.