Month: February 2013

Elwood Staffing – Internal Openings

Internal Jobs

At Elwood Staffing, we believe that people are our most valuable resource. That’s why we are constantly working hard to recruit the best candidates for our corporate positions.

Corporate/Internal Openings: Area Manager Branch Manager Area Sales Consultant Customer Service Manager Staffing Specialist Bilingual Staffing Specialist Staffing Assistant Bilingual Staffing Assistant On-Site Account Manager On-Site Specialist Management Development Program

We place a high priority on attracting and retaining top talent. At Elwood Staffing, we provide each of our employees with CPR: Commitment, Progress, and Rewards.

Commitment

We are committed to providing you with a work environment that inspires you to be your best. We communicate our goals and objectives so we can work together to achieve them. We pride ourselves on listening – listening to your thoughts and suggestions of how we can improve. It means providing you with the resources you need to be successful. It means hiring people like you – equally committed to professional growth and the success of Elwood Staffing.

Progress

We are committed to providing you with opportunities to expand your knowledge and skills. We work in a challenging industry that demands our employees be provided the means of continuous professional improvement. Elwood University provides internal training opportunities such as the Certified Staffing Professional™ (CSP™) certification, a variety of software programs, employment law policies, professional development, and more. We also provide a generous tuition reimbursement program for on-line or classroom courses at accredited colleges and universities. These training tools, combined with your ambition, provide the means to expand your skills and open the door to new opportunities for you at Elwood Staffing.

Rewards

We recognize what it takes to attract good people. We do this by providing competitive salaries and benefits. Our annual bonus program rewards you for a job well done. Our gain-sharing program shares in the success of Elwood Staffing. Our 401(k) participants enjoy a generous annual match of their payroll contributions. Along with paid time off, health, dental and vision coverage, paid holidays, and more, we provide an excellent package of benefits for all of our employees.

Are you in need of a little C-P-R? If you would like to learn more about the opportunities that await you at Elwood Staffing, simply click on our available corporate position that best matches your interest.

Advertisements

Company Culture – The Elwood Staffing Family Difference

DaveJohnMikeMarkElwoodThe Elwood Family Difference

David Elwood established Elwood Staffing as a company that values relationships. What better way to exhibit that than to have your three sons working alongside you to help people and further a father’s dream? Each of them brings a complementary strength and skill to the company to help it succeed. Their respect for each other has allowed them to properly align their goals for the future of Elwood Staffing. When they’re not working together in business, the Elwood men enjoy spending time with each other and encouraging each other in accomplishments outside of the office.

Elwood Staffing is a company based upon integrity. We understand that in order to establish successful relationships with clients and associates, we must establish successful and trusting relationships with our employees. We build trust among employees, clients and associates by collectively sharing the same values and goals. As a company, we work hard to apply the Golden Rule to business by treating everyone – clients, associates and employees – as we would want to be treated. This approach holds us accountable for our actions and identifies Elwood as a company that values people over everything else.

Objectives on Resumes

Monster PenRecruiter Roundtable: Objectives on Resumes

The Recruiter Roundtable is a monthly feature that collects career and job-seeking advice from a group of recruiting experts throughout the US.  The question we put before our panel this month is: How important is having an “objective” or “summary” section at the opening of a candidate’s resume?

 

Your 15-Second ‘Elevator Pitch’
If you want to convert your 15 seconds of fame into an in-person interview at the company of your choice, include a summary statement at the opening of your resume.

A well-written summary statement tells me how your experience and skill set will help my company solve a particular challenge, become more profitable or efficient, or break into or further penetrate target markets. In other words, it will make me want to read the rest of your resume and consider you for the opportunity. The best summary statements I’ve seen are no more than three to five sentences long and show me that you clearly understand the role you’re applying for.

— Cheryl Ferguson, recruiter, The Recruiter’s Studio

A Better Use of That Space?
While a summary could clarify your goal or objective, I don’t think it is a necessary part of one’s resume. Recruiters review candidates’ information every day, and look for certain skills and experiences found in the body of a resume. Save the extra space for accomplishments, goals achieved, awards and unique skills relevant to the job.

— Bob Hancock, senior manager of global talent acquisition, Electronic Arts

Review Real Situations
Including an objective targeted to a specific position can be helpful since it quickly tells an employer why the job candidate is interested in the opportunity and is the right fit for it. The key is to provide information that will pique the hiring manager’s interest without adding superfluous details or items listed later in the resume.

Only include an objective if the resume is targeted to a particular opportunity. Omit this section when creating a general resume.

— DeLynn Senna, executive director of North American permanent placement services, Robert Half International

Most Useful Cases
For me, it’s most important in two cases:

1. Executive or Experienced Candidates: If you have been in business for a while and have taken on a variety of challenges, and even if you have depth in one discipline, it’s still helpful to know your elevator pitch. An experienced executive will be able to make a pithy statement about top-level skills.

2. Career Changers: If you are trying to reposition yourself from one discipline to another (and I know people who have done this successfully), you should explicitly state the skill sets that are directly transferable. A candidate I know went from market research/analytics to organizational development and this [objective statement] was crucial for the hiring teams to connect the dots.

— Ross Pasquale, Search Consultant, Monday Ventures

Build Momentum
If the candidate fully understands the job they are applying for, a succinct objective or summary could be helpful. However, many candidates do a poor job at making their statement match the position of interest. Instead, there is a tendency to lean towards making a broad statement in their objective such as, “To obtain a position in the financial services industry.” A statement such as this loses the momentum the “objective” or “summary” could have had.

— Robyn Timmerman, recruiter, Wells Fargo Wealth Management Group

Source: Monster.com

6 Red Flags Employers See in Your Job History

By Alison Green | U.S.News & World Report LP – Wed, Oct 24, 2012 1:54 PM EDT

Long before you get to a job interview, hiring managers are forming opinions about you based on your resume and your job history. Here are six of the most common red flags they look for.

1. You have multiple short-term jobs. If you have a history of quickly moving from one job to the next without staying very long, employers will wonder whether you get bored easily, or can’t keep a job, or don’t know how to identify the right fit for yourself. If you do have good reasons for the job changes (such as a spouse in the military), make sure to fill in your interviewer quickly so she doesn’t draw the wrong conclusions.

2. You quit your last job with nothing else lined up. Since most people line up a new job before quitting an old one, employers raise their eyebrows if you left without something new waiting. They wonder what the real story is: Did you blow up one day and walk off the job in a fit of anger? Do you get upset at work and make impulsive and rash decisions? Were you actually fired but trying to claim you left on your own?

3. You were laid off from your last job. While plenty of layoffs are about company cutbacks or restructuring, employers know that companies sometimes use them as an opportunity to get rid of lower performers. To combat this question, be sure to mention if your whole team or division was let go. If you were the only one laid off, that raises more questions than if you were part of a group that was laid off.

4. You’ve been unemployed for a while. Even in this economy, some hiring managers look at long-term unemployed candidates and wonder if there’s a reason that other employers haven’t hired them. Fortunately, many employers do understand that it can take time for even good candidates to find work in this market–but it’s important to show that you’ve been spending your time volunteering, building your skills, or something other than a year-long job search.

5. You have large gaps between jobs. When employers see gaps of unemployment, they wonder what happened during that time. Did you leave the previous job with nothing lined up, and if so, why? (See No. 2) Were you working somewhere that you’ve deliberately left off your resume, and if so, what are you hiding? Gaps raise questions that you don’t want on a hiring manager’s mind.

6. None of your past managers are on your reference list. If you only offer peers as references, or other people who didn’t directly supervise your work, hiring managers are going to wonder why. Managers are usually best able to speak to the quality of your work and your strengths and weaknesses, and steering reference-checkers away from those conversations can be a red flag. Plus, employers will usually ask to be put in touch with your past managers anyway.

Alison Green writes the popular Ask a Manager blog, where she dispenses advice on career, job search, and management issues. She’s also the co-author of Managing to Change the World: The Nonprofit Manager’s Guide to Getting Results, and former chief of staff of a successful nonprofit organization, where she oversaw day-to-day staff management, hiring, firing, and employee development.

Elwood Staffing Acquires SOS Employment Group

Elwood Staffing and SOS Employment Group today announced the joining together of their companies, creating an entity that rivals some of the staffing industry’s largest players. With combined annual revenue of more than $750,000,000, the company will now rank in the top 10 of all U.S. commercial staffing companies, the top 20 of all U.S. staffing companies, and just outside the top 50 of all global staffing companies.

Elwood Staffing, headquartered in Columbus, Indiana, and SOS Employment Group, headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah, closed a transaction allowing Elwood Staffing to purchase SOS Staffing Services, Inc., d/b/a SOS Employment Group. SOS will be a wholly-owned subsidiary of Elwood Staffing, but operate more like a sister company giving the combined entity a significantly expanded national footprint and service delivery capability unrivaled by most. The U.S. staffing industry is highly fragmented and is comprised of thousands of staffing agencies. In terms of size, this transaction will put the combined company in the top 1% of all staffing companies in the world.

This combination brings together two of the nation’s leading, privately-held employment services providers, blending talents and resources in the areas of traditional staffing, skilled trades staffing, professional/executive search and outplacement services.

READ FULL STORY

 

March of Dimes – Team Elwood Staffing

Elwood Corporate Every day, thousands of babies are born too soon, too small and often very sick. I’m walking in March for Babies because I want to do something about this. And I need your help.

Please support my walk. Making a secure donation is easy: just click the ‘donate now’ button on this page. Thank you for helping me give all babies a healthy start!

The mission of March of Dimes is to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth, and infant mortality.

Your gift will support March of Dimes research and programs that help moms have full-term pregnancies and babies begin healthy lives. And it will be used to bring comfort and information to families with a baby in newborn intensive care.

http://www.marchforbabies.org/angelamalagon

Thank you,
Angela Malagon