Month: November 2012

Twitter Recruiting

Utilizing Twitter as a tool for social recruiting is often times misunderstood. There are some things you should consider before determining if Twitter could benefit your recruitment strategy.

1. Is your market and book of business large enough to support a following?
If your organization is too narrow, you may not see the return that you expect from Twitter. Those who recruit in multiple markets, with diverse opportunities will see more followers. Don’t let this discourage you. It is good to have a small amount of targeted followers rather than a large following of diluted ones. You can grow your follwers by following others. Search for people to follow by industy or location (search.twitter.com) and follow candidates, other recruiters, and clients.

2. Do your people use Twitter?
This is a tough question to answer. Not every job seeker, in every market uses Twitter. You have to keep in mind that you are not trying to reach every job seeker. You are trying to reach that perfect candidate. Twitter is a tool to help you, it is not the end all of recruiting. Using hash tags # will help job seekers find you. Just don’t overuse your hash tags. Hash tags like #jobs #engineering #staffing, along with the location of the opportuinty, will help target your post in a search. The best way to learn how to post is to search like a job seeker. Log into Twitter and search like a candidate. See what other recrutiers are doing and how they are posting. You can learn a lot from your peers.

3. What is the purpose of using Twitter?
Twitter has multiple purposes and they need to all be utilized in order to be effective. First and foremost, you want to broadcast your job openings. You are a recruiter so your followers should expect to see your job postings. You can save time by utilizing recruiting software to set up an automated schedule. Over time, your followers will not remain active job seekers – they will become ‘retweeters’ sending you great referrals- so you don’t want to run them off. This is why you need to Tweet other engaging information. Please do not Tweet ultra personal information. While you want to portray a human side, save the private information and drunk Tweeting for your personal Twitter. Tweet interesting facts, artices, and tips related to jobs, company, or industry. You can also engage followers by posting trivia and asking questions. Just remember to follow up on iquiries and responses. Having a healthy mix of interaction will make you a good social recruiter and a promote you as an industry professional. You can also use Twitter to market yourself and your company. Tweet interesting facts, history, and press releases that surround you and your company.

4. Do you have time to Tweet on a consistent basis?
Consistency is key in the fast moving world of Twitter. If you want to stay relevant, you have to stay in the conversation. I do not recieve my biggest return of inquiries from Twitter, nor do I connect with as many industry profesionals as I do on other social media sites. For this reason, I do not devote as much of my time to Twitter. I like Twitter because it allows me another avenue to post jobs, give advice, and market my brand with little time and no additional cost to my company. With tools such as Bullhorn Reach and HootSuite, I can schedule my job postings and engaging content in advance and then move on with my traditional daily duties.

There are many critics to the usefulness of Twitter. I do not compare Twitter to other social media sites and job boards like; Facebook, LinkedIn, CareerBuilder, and Monster. Job boards are the best way to reach active candidates while social media sites are a great addition to find passive ones. You have to have a good mix of recruiting tools and invest your time in the ones that are most effective for you.

Angela Malagon
Corporate Recruiter, Elwood Staffing

 

 

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Recruiting

ImageThis story was shared with me by a fellow recruiter-

http://www.recruiter.com/i/why-recruiting-looks-easy/

There is an absolutely wonderful children’s book called 20 Heartbeats about a painter who paints a horse for a very wealthy man. I hate to ruin it for you, but I have to say what happens.

The rich man pays this famous painter to paint his favorite horse. But years go by and the painter won’t finish the painting. The rich man finally shows up at the painter’s house and demands the painting. The painter obligingly whips out a piece of parchment, dashes off a horse in black ink with his brush, and then hands the painting to the rich man. All this takes less than the time of 20 heartbeats.

The rich man is, of course, aghast. He storms after the painter to demand his money back. However, as he walks after the painter, he sees what has been taking so long.

All along the walls are hundreds and hundredsof painted horses. The painter wasn’t procrastinating, he was practicing. The rich man then finally takes a look at the painting that he purchased so long ago, now in his hands. It’s a perfect horse, a horse so real that he whistles to it.

As every art form takes discipline and practice to look easy, every kind of work takes years of diligence to perfect. Recruiting is no different, but few professions look so simple. It’s really hard to pass along a piece of paper, right? You can almost hear hiring managers thinking to themselves, “Yeah, I’ll bet your fingers are really tired from dragging all those resumes from a folder into an email. Real hard work.” Few jobs seem so easy to duplicate.

The end product of recruiting, for one thing, is someone’s else’s work – it is someone else’s talent, ability to interview, and everything else they have that gets them hired that is the end product of the recruiter’s process. It’s hard to pinpoint the recruiter’s exact role in this pseudo-science. Did they identify the talent? Spot them? Find them? Assess them? Understand the job? The culture? Have the right database? The right connections? The right insight into the department or hiring manager psychology? Did they make a lot of calls or know some secret strings to search for in Google? It’s hard to say what it is exactly that the recruiter does and so it’s easy to discount the recruiter’s role entirely.

However, we might be looking at it wrong. A recruiter’s value can’t be found within the process of a single hire. It can’t be found in that space that sometimes spans twenty heartbeats between talking to a manager about a job to the identification of a possible talent.

You have to look at everything that comes before that identification to see the value of a good recruiter. A great recruiter creates the conditions for that magic luck to strike. They don’t talk to a lot of different people. They talk to everyone. They don’t want to know their clients or their company’s competitors. They want to know everything that’s happening at every company in their area. It’s a massive amount of work that requires constant rejection, failure, stress, and is compounded by the minutiae of job offers and the uncertainty of human emotion.

That’s why very few succeed at recruiting. It’s not like there is anything special about that one placement. There is nothing about identifying a candidate and getting them a job offer that requires any particular kind of magic, or even a college degree for that matter. Unlike a beautiful painting, anyone or any recruiter can luck out and make a placement or two. But the background required for long-term recruiting success is much different. It involves the deep study of companies, products, markets, assessment, and professions coupled with a kind of brute force stamina to doggedly pursue the talents of other people. This is the process that forges the recruiter’s talent. This talent, when functioning at its best, is impossible to find.